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brown comparative literature

Overview. Emily Drumsta is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature at Brown University. She specializes in modern Arabic and Francophone literatures, with particular focus on the Arabic novel, gender and the politics of meter in modernist Arabic poetry, and negotiations of language and identity in North African literature and culture. Aug 19,  · Welcome to the research guide for Comparative Literature at Brown University. This guide will help you to get started in your research but you are always welcome to contact me, whether it's to set up a research consultation appointment or just to answer a quick suljettfu.ga: Karen Bouchard. Aug 19,  · On this page, you will find links to specialized databases relating to Comparative Literature. These databases are where you will find citations and often full-text links to articles from journals in these subject areas, as well as some citations to books and book suljettfu.ga: Karen Bouchard.



Comparative literature is the study of literature and other cultural expressions across linguistic and cultural boundaries. At Brown, the Department of Comparative Literature is distinct in its conviction that literary research and instruction must be international in character. The department performs a role similar to that of the study of international relations, but works with languages and artistic traditions, so as to understand cultures "from the inside, brown comparative literature.

Study of seven novels published within the last decade that have enjoyed broad success with reading publics in different places. What pleasures of thought and imagination do we derive from these books, and how can we express clearly our responses?

What is the appeal of these best-sellers first to their home audience, then to readers in other social environments and cultures? How may we reshape our own horizons of thought in order to appreciate them?

Students will be encouraged to develop their skills of literary analysis, interpretation, and critical discussion. Two lectures and one discussion section per week. Several short papers, quizzes, and a final exam. Caribbean Re-writes. Through close readings of canonical European texts and rewritings of them in the twentieth-century Caribbean, we explore the literary possibilities and political implications of writing the old in a new language.

The World of Lyric Poetry. Lyric poetry is the prime mode for conveying emotion in many cultures, brown comparative literature, from ancient times to the present day. This course will survey the variety of forms and themes from the earliest texts from Greece, Rome, China and Japan, then the glories of the Renaissance and the Tang Dynasty, then move to the challenges for lyric expression in the modern world.

Enrollment limited to 19 first year studens. Explores the collaboration between poets and composers in the twentieth century. These works will also be brown comparative literature in depth from a literary and theoretical perspective.

Enrollment limited to 19 first year students. They are also among the most divisive, eliciting passionate disapproval among some and strong admiration among others. Open only to first-year students. Italy has for many decades been the place to which people traveled in order to both encounter something quite alien to their own identities and yet a place where they were supposed to find themselves, indeed to construct their proper selves.

This course introduces students to some of the most important texts that describe this "grand tour. For first year students only. We will read the Aeneid and Paradise Lost with interpretive patience.

The study of fate, character, and poetics will be wedded to investigations of beauty, wonder, and nationhood. Explores the origins, performance, reception, adaptation, and translation of the Nightsbrown comparative literature, one of the most beloved and influential story collections in world literature, brown comparative literature.

We will spend the semester in the company of genies, princes, liars, slaves, mass murderers, brown comparative literature, orientalists, and Walt Disney, and will consider the Nights in the context of its various literary, artistic, and cinematic afterlives, brown comparative literature.

Introduction to tragedy. We will study the early modern self through its manifestation in the soliloquy Shakespearephilosophical treatise Descartesearly modern poetry, and self-portraiture Rembrandt.

We will then read metaphysical poetry to understand the influence of religion on the early modern self, brown comparative literature. Twentieth-Century Experiments. In this course, we will read some of the most experimental and adventurous literature of the 20th century. Instead of understanding texts as mirrors of social reality, we will consider them as laboratories—spaces for testing out, working through, or mixing up new ideas, categories, and ways of seeing and feeling.

We will pay special attention to 20th-century international avant-garde movements, including Futurism, Dadaism, and Surrealism, and we will explore the relation of the literary avant-garde to the avant-garde in painting, cinema, and music. Reading the Renaissance. How do these works figure the renaissance as a cultural formation? A survey of traditional Chinese culture focusing on the major literary and artistic achievements of six major periods in Chinese history, including philosophical texts, poetry, various forms of the fine arts, and vernacular fiction and drama.

A broad brown comparative literature of primary materials will give the student greater insight and appreciation of Chinese culture in general and also provide a foundation for further study of East Asia in other disciplines. An examination of literary censorship in which we read various texts forbidden for putatively violating social, religious, and political norms in particular historical and cultural contexts.

We also analyze the secondary literature surrounding the banning of these ostensibly "dangerous" texts in order to theorize questions and assumptions about the power of art and the ironies generated by these debates. Examines a seemingly universal theme-coming of age-by focusing on texts from disparate periods and cultures. Proposes that notions of "growing up" are profoundly inflected by issues of class, gender and race, and that the literary representation of these matters changes drastically over time.

Crisis and Identity in Mexico, We brown comparative literature explore how key literary, historical, and essayistic writings have dealt with Mexico's past and present, with trauma and transformation, brown comparative literature. All in English. No prerequisites, brown comparative literature.

Literature and the American Presidency. We are accustomed to engaging the American presidency as a public office approached through the prism of government, political science, and the like. This course studies the presidency through a literary lens, focusing on four presidents and three literary genres: epistolography J. Adams and Jeffersonbiography Washington and literary analysis Lincoln. We will also study on brown comparative literature the inaugurals and farewells of more recent presidents and, finally, examine non-traditional literary forms, such as pamphlets, songs, posters, broadsides, graphics, newspapers, brown comparative literature, magazines, and original documents from various presidential elections.

Explores Renaissance attempts to renew, parody, and question the classical epic tradition. The study of poetics, narrative, and imagination will be wedded to investigations of beauty, wonder, and nationhood. Introduction to Cultural Studies. We live in a cultural saturated with information.

The messages we register, the meanings we deduce, and the knowledge upon which we ground our actions and choices require critical examination if we are to engage as thoughtful actors in our personal and civic lives. This class will encourage students to reflect on their initial impressions of and reactions to various media and will give them critical tools to examine how formal and thematic strategies work to shape and elicit our sympathies, our desires, brown comparative literature, our fears, and our beliefs.

Focusing primarily on visual and written texts drawn from popular culture--video, print, film, and Web sources--students will practice their analytical skills by evaluating these texts in classroom discussions, several short writing assignments, and one longer essay.

Reading the work of several cultural theorists, students will learn to analyze persuasive argumentation through an attention to rhetorical and framing devices and to recognize and decipher brown comparative literature cues, enabling them to interpret texts and images and to produce coherent critical positions of brown comparative literature own. This class will prepare participants for college courses that require them to process knowledge and not simply acquire information.

Examines the narrative of detection, beginning with the great dramatic whodunit and mystery of identity Oedipus Rex. Literary texts which follow a trail of knowledge, whether to establish a fact who killed Laius? We read Sophocles' intellectual children. We also analyse seminal films of the genre, including Laura and Vertigo. Will include the twentieth-century detective story, with particular attention to women writers and the genre of the female private eye. Examines brown comparative literature condition of the subject in Western novels and plays written after Traditional markers of identity in works of literature are being eroded by globalization, split families, the invasion of science in genetics, and increased mobility.

Signs of this crisis include loss of agency and individuality, various pathologies including schizophrenia, and the replacement of humans with clones. We will investigate the intricacies of the derailment of the subject and how literary form is affected in novels by Beckett, Coetzee, W. Stories and Storytelling. An introduction to stories, how they are constructed, and how they are told, brown comparative literature. Our discussion will range from topics such as fictional forms, brown comparative literature, the acts of reading and of telling, brown comparative literature, the role of memory, and the invention of self, to questions of time and duration.

Texts examined will be drawn from a variety of genres, periods, and cultures. How did humans organize knowledge before Wikipedia? This course explores the fascinating history of encyclopedic texts, archives, and databases in various cultural contexts. We consider issues of book history, the classification of knowledge, and the obsession to collect, compile, and document everything knowable and unknowable in both real and fictional encyclopedias.

The use of Wikipedia in this course is not only tolerated but required. Students will be responsible for originating, composing, and curating new Wikipedia entries over the course of the semester. Literature and Knowledge. What is knowledge? How do we know what we know? We will read literary texts brown comparative literature with these questions to consider how knowledge relates to power, and how deception, stupidity, and mystification force us to question what we know, brown comparative literature.

Chinese Empire and Brown comparative literature. This course explores ancient and modern approaches to empire and imperialism, focusing on China from the Qin BCE establishment of unified empire through the Qing CE confrontation with the British and other European empires.

Beginning with a survey of pre-modern female literary personae in Arabic the elegist, the mystic, the singing slavewe will then examine major figures in the early modern feminist movement, modernist poetry, autobiography, film, and the novel. No Arabic required; supplemental Arabic section may be offered at the discretion of the professor. Films by Moufida Tlatli, Annemarie Jacir.

Intersections of Brown comparative literature and Culture in the West. This course will introduce students to ways in which knowledge, brown comparative literature, power and race have been interrelated in understandings of culture and in the writing and reception of literature.

We will then consider changing ideas of alliance, belonging and power, in the context of contemporary American and global politics. The course will draw from readings across various languages, and from the work and lectures of several guest speakers. What did the pen or writing brush enable them to express and achieve? How were brown comparative literature able to negotiate the gaps between a male classical literary language and their own vernacular speech? Instructor permission required.

Introduction to Scandinavian Literature. An introduction to major brown comparative literature of Scandinavian writers, painters and filmmakers over the past years. Inventing the Renaissance. The invention of the Renaissance as a cultural formation and as a part of the western cultural imaginary.

 

 

brown comparative literature

 

Overview. Emily Drumsta is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature at Brown University. She specializes in modern Arabic and Francophone literatures, with particular focus on the Arabic novel, gender and the politics of meter in modernist Arabic poetry, and negotiations of language and identity in North African literature and culture. Aug 19,  · Welcome to the research guide for Comparative Literature at Brown University. This guide will help you to get started in your research but you are always welcome to contact me, whether it's to set up a research consultation appointment or just to answer a quick suljettfu.ga: Karen Bouchard. Aug 19,  · On this page, you will find links to specialized databases relating to Comparative Literature. These databases are where you will find citations and often full-text links to articles from journals in these subject areas, as well as some citations to books and book suljettfu.ga: Karen Bouchard.